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Showing posts with the label Academy Award

Academy Award Winning Dangerous Moves

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As we head into Oscar weekend,  TheArchive  is proud to present one of our favorite Academy Award winning films,  Dangerous Moves . It is the story of two chess masters who duel each other in classic gameplay but discover that it is their differing ideologies that truly raise the stakes. When aging Soviet Jew and title holder Akiva Liebskind arrives in Geneva to face off against his former student and USSR defector in the World Championship match, the Soviet authorities threaten to harm Akiva's family if he does not defeat the rogue player. Their differences will be put to the ultimate test when discovering they are mere pawns in a much more sinister game. TheArchive  brings you the Oscar winning Arthur Cohn production of  Dangerous Moves . “An engrossing Swiss film that offers a behind-the-scenes look at the cerebral sport of chess.” - Spirituality and Practice Review TheArchive  channel is dedicated to aficionados and lovers of story, craft, and silver screen fun – streaming rare

Justine and Jason Bateman Take the Lead

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As we continue to feature our weekly remake spotlight we are pleased to announce that we just published the Jason Batemen and Justine Bateman drama Can You Feel Me Dancing . Fresh off her lauded directorial debut with "Violet" and her latest book "Brave," both exploring social issues and norms, we found it interesting that even in her earlier creative days, Bateman gravitated to material that lifted up underrepresented people. In "Dancing," Justine Bateman plays a headstrong 19-year-old who refuses to be held back by her blindness, and when she feels penned in by her overprotective family including her brother (played by Jason Bateman), she fights and dances her way to independence. Just like in the Academy Award winning Scent of a Woman, Can You Feel Me Dancing tells a beautiful story of blindness and its power to transform other's expectations amidst the struggle for self efficacy and acceptance. The Batemans handle the subject matter with aplomb whi