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Showing posts with the label Emmy

Family Pictures on World Autism Awareness Day

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On World Autism Awareness Day we honor those around the globe who are on the autism spectrum. In America alone, 1 in 54 children are diagnosed with autism, a staggering statistic that finds millions without the necessary support to live meaningful lives.   TheArchive is proud to have acquired a miniseries called Family Pictures based on the novel of the same name by Sue Miller. It was directed by Philip Saville and stars an amazing cast including Anjelica Huston, Sam Neill, Kyra Sedgwick, and Dermot Mulroney.   Spanning forty years, this four hour mini-series brings to life a powerful and intimate portrait of the passion, upheaval, and pain experienced by one family. The Eberhardts embark on a journey of redemption to regain the happiness of the past as they have come to appreciate their decades-full family photo albums. The challenges that all families face are compounded with the birth of a child on the autism spectrum and how that challenge changes them all forever.   Anjelica Hus

TheArchive’s Mount Rushmore of the Conflicted

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This President’s day TheArchive honors the men who have led our country through conflict. Some have guided us past it while others caused it.   Either way, it’s challenging at the top and these stories of leadership have carved their way into our zeitgeist. In Ronald Reagan, The Hollywood Years, and Ronald Reagan, the Presidential Years , we track Reagan’s rise to power and his brush with the kind of conflict he could rise above. From that iconic moment on stage with Goldwater in 1964, to his governorship shortly thereafter, to his presidency, Reagan is celebrated as one of the most popular presidents of our time. But we also learn that the Iran-Contra affair certainly led to some unseen conflict that unraveled his favor but only for a short while. Reagan earned a nickname, the “Teflon president,” since conflict rarely seemed to stick to a leader of such profound popularity. Saving Lincoln explores the true story of Abraham Lincoln and his bodyguard, U.S. Marshal Ward Hill Lamon wh

Cicely Tyson: "Positive Contributions to My Heritage"

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To commemorate the beginning of Black History Month,  we are celebrating two remarkable American heroes who are forever and inextricably linked in film history. A Woman Called Moses  stars the late, legendary Cicely Tyson in a miniseries honoring the life of Harriett Tubman who summoned the strength and indomitable will to defy and overcome a tyrannous system.  In her near 70 year career on screen, the Emmy, Tony, and Academy Honorary Award winner explored a broad and deep mix of roles in film, television and theater, many that worked to lift and amplify the black experience. "Whatever good I have accomplished as an actress I believe came in direct proportion to my efforts to portray Black women who have made positive contributions to my heritage." A Woman Called Moses  was produced as a television miniseries and based on the life of Harriet Tubman, the escaped slave who organized the infamous Underground Railroad, ultimately leading scores from enslavement to freedom.  "

The Final Days of a President

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Imagine Putin test-driving a Tesla gifted by the American people, with Trump riding shotgun!   What does an American President do when he knows his days are numbered?   One President indeed stepped down due to overwhelming pressure, the infamous Richard Milhouse Nixon, after some ridiculous stunts and justifications. One of the best made movies on Nixon is ‘ The Final Days ’ (1989) which premiered on ABC, with over 2.5 hours of live action mixed with archival footage, it captures all the details of Woodward and Bernstein’s best-selling book on the Watergate scandal.   Featuring a riveting performance from Lane Smith as Nixon, alongside legendary actors Richard Kiley, David Ogden Stiers, and Gary Sinise, we see the how Nixon and his staff navigate the intense scrutiny of his administration and the risky moves they made to extend his Presidency.   Under Nixon’s direction to ‘preserve the integrity of the Presidency’ and to ‘ensure national security,’ they inevitably allowed him to overru